Archive for boom boom

Boom Boom Magazine 2009 Content Map

Posted in alphabeat, aura dione, boom boom magazine, caroline henderson, danish music scene, ida corr, kenneth bager, mike sheridan, music promotion, sinne eeg, sociale medier, Volbeat with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 12, 2009 by boomboommag

The blog version of Boom Boom Magazine has now been online for a couple of months. To sum up all the blog posts, artists and genres, we’ve made a content map —

Boom Boom Magazine Content Map

Boom Boom Magazine Content Map

In tag format —

boom boom —  aura dione —  boom boom magazineida corr —  mike sheridan —  alphabeatdúné — boom boom mag  —  volbeat — aura — sinne eeg — boom magazine — boomboom — caroline henderson — diddan degn karstensen —  aura singer — michael poulsen — kenneth bager — cornstick new music and news — boom boom music — music export — ida corr  — inger/aura — anders houmøller thomsen —  venice — aura dione wiki — boom boom blog   —  dup
sinne eeg blu note —  “spleen united” — mike sheridan blog — caroline, the danish jazz singer — “i’ve been riding all –night” ida corr — bjarne albrektsen — midem 2009 publisher —  singer aura — columbine aura dione — boom boom boom — volbeat sold out cover —  boom ! — thomas thomsen danish

Read more about social media (In Danish).

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Strippers, T-Shirts, Dubplates & Discount Stores

Posted in alternative marketing strategies, alternative promotion strategies, boom boom magazine, music promotion with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 2, 2009 by boomboommag

How do you promote a band or independent label at a time when most of the music industry is wallowing in the wake of a depression caused by the global financial crisis, sales are plummeting, piracy is rampant and new technology is changing the way business can and should be conducted? It’s a question aspiring musicians and industry professionals have to face – especially since recession seems to have little impact on the number of hopefuls trying to make it big.

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Factors like these have encouraged a lot of people to adopt a more creative approach to promotion, and  to search for alternate means of distributing and selling records – or, quite simply, to find other sources  of income to supplement revenue from concerts and record sales.

Hard-rock fashionistas

Rock Hard Power Spray are known for their penchant for rocking with certain parts of the male anatomy  out, and also for launching their career with a carefully planned on-stage sex scandal involving a stripper. They landed on the front page of the Danish tabloid newspaper Ekstra Bladet long before they landed a record deal.

Their no-frills, aggressive and melodic hard rock and carefree, confident attitude sealed them a deal  ith the major label Universal, who released  their debut album “Commercial Suicide”. At the same time, the band launched a collection of T-shirts featuring not only the band’s name in huge letters, but also a very sexy, very rock’n’roll female silhouette that reminded people of how they first heard of the band. All of a  sudden it seemed that practically every Dane was wearing the T-shirts, perhaps hoping to claim a vicarious slice of the band’s fast-lane lifestyle. Sales of the T-shirts dwarfed those of “Commercial  Suicide”, but the T-shirts wouldn’t have been popular if it hadn’t been for the Rock Hard boys’ cool image and high-energy tunes. This is home-made synergy in action, straight out of the rehearsal rooms and into high-street fashion boutiques.

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Dubplate hype-making
Far, far away from the bright stage lights that engulf rock stars, in the deepest and darkest recesses of  Copenhagen clubs, is where we are most likely to find dubstep artist Obeah – also known as DJ 2000F, party promoter from the OHOI! crew, and as Frederik Birket-Smith, co-founder of Kraken Recordings. Obeah is undoubtedly the leading Danish exponent of the dubstep sound that originated in Croydon in South London and has rapidly become a global phenomenon. This music, with its thundering basslines, cavernous reverbs and ultra-dark mood, doesn’t easily lend itself to traditional means of promotion like mainstream radio play, chart shows and music videos. Instead, artists like Obeah employ dubstep culture’s own particular method of promoting new records.

“Dubstep, grime and drum’n’bass are different to other genres,” Birket-Smith explains. “They come out of the dubplate culture that originated in reggae. You supply the right people with a dubplate (dubplates are individually produced acetate records, that allow DJs to play records no one else has) prior to the release to build hype around the record. Dubstep is basically a trainspotting culture, so that’s what we’re working with.”

“It’s all about timing and the right contacts. First, you need to know which DJs will like your particular track. Pick the right ones and it’ll be played at raves around the world, keeping ravers guessing who’s behind that massive bassline until, when the hype is at its peak, you release it to the public on 12” vinyl.”

[…]

Give the people what they didn’t know they wanted
Much like dubstep, world music is usually considered a niche genre. However, Copenhagen-based band Klezmofobia, who play a rock-infused version of traditional Jewish klezmer, have turned their vibrantly melodic music – equal parts melancholia and raucous partying – into something of a phenomenon in their home country. They sold 20,000 copies of their debut album “Tantz!” – which is enough for a gold album in Denmark despite it not being sold in ordinary record shops.

Klezmofobia signed with Tiger Music, a label founded by discount store chain Tiger, which sells its  releases exclusively in its own stores. “We jumped at the chance when it presented itself,” says Bjarke Kolerus, Klezmofobia clarinettist. “We sent in a demo, and then recorded, mixed, and mastered the album in record time once Tiger Music gave us the go-ahead. Of course, we had discussed the pros and cons of being sold between pencil sharpeners and mugs, but we decided it would be better than ending up as a niche band. We weren’t interested in making a lot of money. We wanted the visibility that Tiger’s concept offered.”

[…]

Klezmofobia are now taking their music out into the world, starting with a tour of Germany and Austria. Just like the boys from Rock Hard Power Spray and Kraken Recordings, they’re crossing borders, both geographical and within the music industry.

Text: Jesper Buhl
Photography: RAW FORMAT

MB

Volbeat — Danish Dynamite

Posted in boom boom magazine, danish heavy metal, danish music scene, metal, Volbeat with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 1, 2009 by boomboommag

The Finns have bowed down in admiration in the snow. The Germans have hailed them as über-cool. Their own compatriots have succumbed too. Volbeat are Denmark’s biggest-ever heavy sensation!

Volbeat -- Danish Dynamite
Volbeat — Danish Dynamite

It’s been many years since singer Michael Poulsen and his band played to tiny audiences and slept in flea-pit hotels or on cold trainstation benches while on tour. At the time Poulsen was in Dominus, a  hard-hitting Danish death-metal band that released four albums between 1995 and 2000. Not many people were listening, but Poulsen kept up both the momentum and his faith in the music.

In 2001 he formed a new band, Volbeat, whose heavy sound also reflected his love of ’50s rock’n’roll. One bright scribbler dubbed the band “Elvis metal” – and that’s alright mama, ’cos soon the heartbreak hotel days were behind them, and Volbeat no longer faced being lonesome tonight when they played live.

The band’s 2007 breakthrough album “Rock the Rebel/Metal the Devil” was a bona fide sensation that topped the Danish charts and went platinum – something no other Danish heavy metal band has ever achieved. The follow-up, the critically acclaimed “Guitar Gangsters & Cadillac Blood”, also made it to the top in Denmark.

Volbeat’s success has also been spreading through Europe. The famously metallic Finns sent the album  right to the top of the charts, the Swedes took it to no.4, and it entered the Top 30 in Germany, Austria, Norway, the Netherlands and Switzerland.

The hard road
All this success may just be the beginning, as the group continue to tour with an intensity that would impress even B.B. King. “We played about 30 festivals this summer, and now we’re touring Denmark and the rest of Europe,” says Poulsen. “If we can fit it in, we also hope to make it to the USA in 2008. We’re on a real roll at the moment – in 2007 we played 103 gigs in nine months. But we wouldn’t have it any other way. When I get home from touring I soon get restless. As soon as I’ve zapped through all the TV channels I start thinking: ‘I’ll go for a walk, then.’ Musicians are like rats in a cage. If you pull us off our wheel, it won’t be long before we jump back on again.”

The singer and songwriter thinks that the lean  years, when they had to fight tooth and nail forgigs and a breakthrough, helped toughen the group’s metal soul: “We put up with a helluva lot. But ultimately it’s helped us. Our success  hasn’t been easy, like winning a competition, but our boyhood dream has been fulfilled. We make a living from playing, and we enjoy it. Who knows when the ship will sail in the other direction…? But even when things do start to turn we’ll just keep on going, ’cos we’ve already tried  scraping rock bottom,” he promises.
As the King sang, “It’s now or never!”

TEXT ANDERS HOUMØLLER THOMSEN
PHOTOGRAPHY NIKOLAJ PALMSKOV

Danish Producers — Artistic Midwives

Posted in boom boom magazine, danish music scene, frederik thaae, midem - cannes with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 27, 2009 by boomboommag

The Danish underground is seething and bubbling with talent and resourcefulness. The creative boom is personified by the new generation of inventive PRODUCERS who fiddle about with, screw together, play with and respond to the music, endowing it with that final, crucial and dynamic impact. BOOM BOOM zooms in on some of the most prominent musical midwives on the Danish scene. We asked this diverse bunch, whose sole common denominator is their individuality, what they feel are the most important features of a producer as an artistic facilitator.

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FREDERIK THAAE

(Murder, I Am Bones, The Late Parade, Lise Westzynthius, Prins Nitram etc.) Thaae is a graduate of the Academy of Music and plays in – and produces for, naturally – the manic, hard-hitting rock band A Kid Hereafter. “A producer’s main task is to make every job a project special,” he says. “It’s about having a profile and setting an aesthetic agenda.” He thinks the fact that many of the producers are also musicians is to their advantage when working behind the mixing desk: “It provides a shared perspective.” Thaae is currently in dialogue with Jesper ‘Junior’ Mortensen (ex-Junior Senior), the DJ known as Turkman, and Jacob Bellens (Murder) about new partnerships.
Text: Thomas borre
Photography: Raw Format

China in her Hand — Sinne Eeg

Posted in boom boom magazine, danish music scene, jazz, sinne eeg with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 26, 2009 by boomboommag

Jazz has gone from lobby to hobby in China, which is good news for songstress Sinne Eeg. Asia has  served as her springboard to the rest of the world.

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Sinne Eeg has taken both Danish and international jazz audiences by storm in recent years. Whether singing her own songs or interpreting classics, she has been widely praised for her soft, elegant phrasing with just a hint of danger.

Early on in her career, Eeg realized that if she was ever going to get anywhere she’d have to make it happen herself. “You have to take it from the bottom up,” says Eeg. “You get nothing from sitting and waiting for Blue Note Records to call, or waiting to be asked to plays tadium gigs. I’ve learned that you have to take the less lucrative jobs first if you want to forge the right contacts. I paid for my first recordings myself and did most of the practical work associated with the releases. I made sure that jazz clubs and the media knew all about my music by making lots of phone calls and sending lots of e-mails.  It has been a long, slow process to reach the stage I’m at now. It takes patience.”

Big in Japan
Eeg’s journey began back in 2003 with the release of her self-titled debut album, which was to take her, somewhat by chance, to Japan  and China. She found herself in Japan as the conductor of an amateur  choir, which enabled her to meet new people and led to a tour of the country with the Martin Schack Trio. Pianist Martin Schack’s brother was living in Shanghai at the time, which opened the gateway to China. “We punted my CD around various clubs in Shanghai,” she recalls. “One owner wanted to hire us  for three months. That was a bit unusual, but of course we said yes. It was in Shanghai’s oldest jazz club, which is owned by a famous Chinese actor who is also a jazz enthusiast. It was a great job.”

Wild response

Eeg has learned that there are big  differences between Japanese and Chinese jazz audiences. “The Japanese have a long tradition of being into jazz and listening to the music in clubs,” she says. “The first time I played a gig there, I was a bit taken aback by the enthusiastic response. The audiences are definitely not as shy and polite as you might think. They holler and join in, and a lot of them have an almost nerdy interest in Scandinavian jazz. Jazz is a bit more of a recent phenomenon in China, but a lot has changed since our first visit. A few years ago, jazz was mainly confined to expensive hotel lobbies –  s little more than background music. Now, you can tell that a lot of Chinese listeners have acquired a  deeper interest in the music and its artistic dimensions, which is nice.”

Eeg’s music is also starting to win over audiences beyond China, Japan and her home country. Sweden, Norway and Germany are showing interest, and her most recent Danish-language album – “Kun en drøm” (“Only a Dream”) – has just been reissued in English as “Remembering You”. Curiously enough, she first met the album’s Danish producer, Chris Minh Doky, in Tokyo. “I often meet Danish colleagues abroad, which says something about the impression that Danish jazz has made,” Eeg explains. “I met Chris Minh Doky via Diana Krall’s manager Mary-Ann Topper, who had heard us play a club in Tokyo. Later, she met Chris, who was also touring Japan, and encouraged him to go to one of my gigs. He did  so, and a few months later we were recording “Kun en drøm” together, which includes interpretations  of old Danish film and stage classics.”

Mike Sheridan — Technoboy Wonder

Posted in boom boom magazine, danish electronica, danish music scene, electronica, mike sheridan with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 22, 2009 by boomboommag

He [Mike Sheridan] may be just 17 years old, but he’s already a well-known figure and very much in demand on the Danish electronica scene.

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Talented composer and producer Mike Sheridan may well end up following in the footsteps of colleague Trentemøller and achieve major electronic success – and not just within the confines of nightclubs. But he’s in no rush. He has a bright future ahead of him – not to mention his 18th birthday!

[…]

Inspirational Christmas present
Sheridan first started to appear in Copenhagen nightclubs at the age of 15 – not as a guest, but as a DJ, behind decks he could barely see over.  “I wasn’t even old enough to get into the clubs, so at first my parents had to come with me when I was playing,” explains Mike, who gets his English-sounding name from his Irish father. “They’ve been a great source of support, even when I decided to drop out of  chool.” Sheridan’s interest in music was sparked in 1999 at the age of 10, when his dad, an IT innovator, gave him the music-editing programme Acid for his Christmas. These days, Sheridan calls his computer his right hand.

[…]

In Danish — Læs mere om Mike Sheridan.

International ambitions
So far, Sheridan’s musical reportage is primarily known in Denmark, although on several  occasions – including in the company of Trentemøller – he has guest DJed at Berlin nightclubs, most recently during PopKomm 2008. “Of course, I’d like to get my music out into the world, and I am focusing right now on Germany and the UK,” says Sheridan, who is releasing his music on his own label, in collaboration with the Scandinavian distributors Playground Music.

[…]

Electronic boom: long live diversity!
Mike Sheridan and Trentemøller are just two examples of the qualitative boom in the Danish electronic scene. Among those making the biggest splash in 2008 are the duo Lulu Rouge, also known as DJ Buda and T.O.M. These two gents have long  been part of the Copenhagen club scene, as both DJs and  producers. Their CV includes single tracks and remixes for the likes of Telepopmusic, Kasper Bjørke, Tina Dickow, Filur, Djosos Krost, Morten Varano, Luke, Booty Cologne, Nephew, Laid Back, Veto and People  Press Play. Their debut album, “Bless You”, on the label Music for Dreams, has attracted enormous attention from  large parts of Europe.

[…

]Denmark also has a strong tradition of compilations: Stella Polaris (Stella Polaris Music/Playground) has  spent more than a decade as a chillout-event-organiser and CD publisher; VUF Records releases free download compilations via vuf-empire.dk; and the Luftkastellet albums (Music for Dreams) profiled  Danish artists on an  international stage. Most recently, the radio DJs Le Gammeltoft and Keld Tolstrup released the club compilation “The Sound of Copenhagen” on Copenhagen Records. To mark its second anniversary, Elektroniske Tirsdage (Electronic Tuesdays) will release a double compilation albums  designed to convey the breadth and the depth of the Danish scene.

Text: Thomas Borre
Photography: RAW Format

MB

Danish showcase night at MIDEM — Ida Corr, Camille Jones, Kenneth Bager, Mike Sheridan playing at Midem in Cannes

Posted in danish music scene, ida corr, kenneth bager, midem - cannes with tags , , , , , , , , , on January 19, 2009 by boomboommag

After previous campaigns for Danish rock music, focus is now put on the Danish dance and electronica scene. This comes to show when DDME – Danish Dance Music Export presents Ida Corr and Camille Jones live in concert with DJ sets by Kenneth Bager, Rune RK, The Montanas (aka Morjac and Michael Parsberg), and Mike Sheridan at MIDEM in Cannes.

Read more here — Danish showcase night at MIDEM

Text: Henrik Friis, MXD

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